Essay on bushfires

Do While intLoop > 0
lngLastPos = lngPos
lngPos1 = InStr(lngPos + 1, strIn, Left$(strDelimiter, 1))
If lngPos1 > 0 Then
lngPos = lngPos1
intLoop = intLoop - 1
Else
lngPos = Len(strIn) + 1
Exit Do
End If
Loop
' If the string wasn't found, and this wasn't
' the first pass through (intLoop would equal intPiece
' in that case) and intLoop > 1, then you've run
' out of chunks before you've found the chunk you
' want. That is, the chunk number was too large.
' Return "" in that case.
If (lngPos1 = 0) And (intLoop intPiece) And (intLoop > 1) Then
dhExtractString = vbNullString
Else
If blnKeepDelimiter Then
dhExtractString = Trim(Mid$(strIn, lngLastPos + 1, _
lngPos - lngLastPos))
Else
dhExtractString = Trim(Mid$(strIn, lngLastPos + 1, _
lngPos - lngLastPos - 1))
End If
End If
End Function
Function dhTrimAll( _
ByVal strInput As String, _
Optional blnRemoveTabs As Boolean = True) As String

It has been estimated that we are losing 137 plant, animal and insect species every single day due to rainforest deforestation, which equates to 50,000 species a year. [65] Others state that tropical rainforest deforestation is contributing to the ongoing Holocene mass extinction . [66] [67] The known extinction rates from deforestation rates are very low, approximately 1 species per year from mammals and birds which extrapolates to approximately 23,000 species per year for all species. Predictions have been made that more than 40% of the animal and plant species in Southeast Asia could be wiped out in the 21st century. [68] Such predictions were called into question by 1995 data that show that within regions of Southeast Asia much of the original forest has been converted to monospecific plantations, but that potentially endangered species are few and tree flora remains widespread and stable. [69]

There’s nothing quite as exciting as discovering a debut author who lives up to the accolades that swirl around prior to the novel even releasing. Kristy Cambron and her first Hidden Masterpiece novel did not disappoint and the lovely things I had heard were affirmed when I read this stunning novel about a talented and beautiful violinist who finds herself in the darkest and most evil of places ~ the  World War II concentration camp known as Auschwitz. This story is told in two parts ~ the contemporary story line reveals a modern art dealer, trying to move beyond the hurt of a shattered relationship and a man born with a silver spoon. Both Sera and William are searching for the original painting of a young violinist and begin to discover hope and healing as they pursue their quest. The historical element focuses on the young aristocratic Adele, whose heart reaches out to the tormented Jews and pays the consequences. Kristy Cambron writes the historical story with tenderness, authenticity, and beauty, despite the depravity and darkness of Auschwitz. As someone who majored in World War II history, it is with some knowledge that I can say Kristy’s research is impeccable and her translation of that research onto the page, exceptional. I was immersed in Adele’s pain and fear but taken on a transcendent journey to find beauty, hope, and love. My only criticism is that the contemporary story did not match the historical thread’s brilliance and tended to pull me out of the story. That said, I loved the premise of Sera and William’s search for the painting and enjoyed them as characters but the deeper level of connection with the characters truly came about when reading about Adele, Vladimir, and Omara. That said, Kristy’s talent for the written word is evident in her vivid imagery, genuine characterisation, and compelling prose and as such, I highly recommend this story and eagerly await the literary journey in the sequel,   A Sparrow in Terezin .

The incendiary effects of a nuclear explosion do not present any especially characteristic features. In principle, the same overall result with respect to destruction of life and property can be achieved by the use of conventional incendiary and high-explosive bombs . [48] It has been estimated, for example, that the same fire ferocity and damage produced at Hiroshima by one 16-kiloton nuclear bomb from a single B-29 could have instead been produced by about 1,200 tons/ kilotons of incendiary bombs from 220 B-29s distributed over the city. [48] [49] [50]

Essay on bushfires

essay on bushfires

The incendiary effects of a nuclear explosion do not present any especially characteristic features. In principle, the same overall result with respect to destruction of life and property can be achieved by the use of conventional incendiary and high-explosive bombs . [48] It has been estimated, for example, that the same fire ferocity and damage produced at Hiroshima by one 16-kiloton nuclear bomb from a single B-29 could have instead been produced by about 1,200 tons/ kilotons of incendiary bombs from 220 B-29s distributed over the city. [48] [49] [50]

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